Time to get beyond ideological slogans and platitudes: the immigration problem is multifaceted and complex

Folks,

A serious and rational consideration of the immigration question – one that goes beyond naive interpretations of slogans (welcome the stranger, etc.) – must begin with crucial distinctions and considerations, such as:

  1. The common good of the country of origin, the individual good of the traveler, and the common good of the country of destination
  2. The traveler as seeking to pass through, visit or remain in the country of destination
  3. The traveler as small in number versus the traveler as large in number
  4. The traveler as trespassing versus the traveler as not trespassing
  5. The traveler as sick versus the traveler as healthy
  6. The traveler as harmful versus the traveler as beneficial
  7. Traveling as a last resort versus traveling as a first resort
  8. Traveling far from the country of origin versus traveling close to the country of origin
  9. What is owed by the traveler in justice versus what is owed in charity?
  10. What is owed by the government and society of origin in justice versus what is owed in charity?
  11. What is owed by the government and society of destination in justice versus what is owed in charity?
  12. What is owed by other governments and societies in justice versus what is owed in charity?

The above list is hardly perfect and comprehensive, but it provides food for thought and a good introduction to the following articles that take up the immigration problem in thoughtful and balanced ways from a Biblical, rational and commonsense perspective,

A Nation has a Right to Control It’s Borders, by Scott Richert

What does St. Thomas Say About Immigration, by John Horvat

Best,

Joe

 

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